Reem With A View

"Names and attributes must be accommodated to the essence of things, and not the essence to the names, since things come first and names afterwards." – Galileo

Why Global Warming is actually good for Mankind & Earth

A fascinating counter-point on the Global Warming phenomenon is given by Thomas Gale Moore. Read his amazing article “Why Global Warming Would Be Good For You”.

Some key points:

1. “…around 6,000 years ago the earth sustained temperatures that were probably more than four degrees Fahrenheit hotter than those of the twentieth century, yet mankind flourished. The Sahara desert bloomed with plants, and water loving animals such as hippopotamuses wallowed in rivers and lakes. Dense forests carpeted Europe from the Alps to Scandinavia. The Midwest of the United States was somewhat drier than it is today, similar to contemporary western Kansas or eastern Colorado; but Canada enjoyed a warmer climate and more rainfall.”

2. “A warmer climate would produce the greatest gain in temperatures at northern latitudes and much less change near the equator. Not only would this foster a longer growing season and open up new territory for farming but it would mitigate harsh weather. The contrast between the extreme cold near the poles and the warm moist atmosphere on the equator drives storms and much of the earth’s climate. This difference propels air flows; if the disparity is reduced, the strength of winds driven by equatorial highs and Arctic lows will be diminished. Warmer nighttime temperatures, particularly in the spring and fall, create longer growing seasons, which should enhance agricultural productivity.”

3. “Carbon dioxide concentrations may have been up to sixteen times higher about 60 million years ago without producing runaway greenhouse effects…”

4. “As the earth warmed with the waning of the Ice Age, the sea level rose as much as 300 feet; hunters in Europe roamed through modern Norway; agriculture developed in the Middle East. For about 3,000 to 4,000 years the globe enjoyed what historians of climate call the Climatic Optimum period — a time when average world temperatures — at least in the Northern Hemisphere — were significantly hotter than today.”

5. “As a Senator, Al Gore, writing on the prospect of further global warming and its potential harm, contended that the temperature rise over the last century has led to increased drought in Africa…  His conclusion, however, is based on a false premise: for most of that period the earth was cooling, not warming! His chart actually implies that further cooling would be undesirable.”

Thomas Gale Moore
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3 Responses

  1. andreaskluth says:

    I like the attempt to be contrarian. But what about the overwhelming downside of:
    – feedback loops that make for catastrophic weather systems, deadly for humans?
    – new diseases and pandemics that come about as ecosystems suddenly face higher temperatures (ie, accelerating pace of equivalents of Ebola, bird flu, AIDS, swine flu….)
    – counterintuitive ice age in Europe, as melting north pole interrupts Gulf Stream conveyor belt of heat.

    Perhaps the best we can say is that we don’t know yet exactly what will happen.

  2. Reem says:

    There is definitely a downside, but Global Warming is unavoidable. We might as well look at the positives. I am with the late Michael Crichton on the fact that the evidence is weak about “human activity” causing global warming. Its more of a cyclical phenomenon. Check this: http://www.crichton-official.com/speech-ourenvironmentalfuture.html

  3. andreaskluth says:

    Will peruse. Thanks for the link.

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